29 Mar

COMPLETION VS DRAW MORTGAGES

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

COMPLETION VS DRAW MORTGAGES

Completion vs Draw Mortgages
If you are considering building a new home, then you need to be educated on the difference between draw and completion mortgages. When you meet with a builder, there is tons of terminology and information you should be aware of so you are properly covered.

Completion mortgages mean that the builder does not expect any funds until you take possession of your new home. Before the building process begins, you will have to go to your mortgage professional to get your application verified for the build to start. The benefits of this option are that you don’t have to put down any payments before you take possession, you can add upgrades to the mortgage, and the lender doesn’t require all final information from you until 30 days before you take possession. During this build process you will want to take extra care of your finances to ensure nothing changes, which could put your initial approval in jeopardy. Any changes that could possibly change your financial position and your credit should be discussed with your mortgage professional. This can include things like switching jobs, buying a car, and taking out any new loan.

A draw mortgage is preferred by home builders because it allows them to receive portions of funds during predetermined stages of the build process. To obtain a draw mortgage, the beginning process is the same and you will have to go to your lender to be verified for the build to begin. The benefits of this option are that the builder is able to manage their cash flow, inspectors are sent to verify stages of development are met, and funds sent to the builder are handled through a lawyer. There are some extra costs associated with this option though. Inspections will incur a cost upon each stage met and interest payments may be incurred as well. You also do not have the option to add upgrades throughout the build process with a draw mortgage as the first advance sets the loan in stone.

As always, if you would like to discuss draw and completion mortgages in preparation for your new build contact us at Dominion Lending Centres! We are happy to help you figure out your financial future.

Written by:

ALIM CHARANIA

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Alim is part of DLC Regional Mortgage Group based in Red Deer, AB.

24 Mar

FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS TAX CREDIT?

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

18 DEC 2015

DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS TAX CREDIT?

Do You Know About the First Time Home Buyers Tax Credit?

Buying your first home is often the largest financial commitment you will have made and just coming up with the down payment is a difficult task for many! Then there are the legal fees, property transfer fees, disbursements and all those other costs that can really add up, creating a huge dent in your finances!

To help offset these costs for first time home buyers, the Federal Government created the First Time Home Buyers Tax Credit (HBTC) to assist home buyers with the costs associated with purchasing their home.

Who is Eligible?

The HBTC applies to first time homebuyers who intend to occupy the home as their principal residence no later than one year after acquisition. To be considered, a first time home buyer, neither the individual nor the individual’s spouse or common law partner will have owned  another home in the year of the home purchase or in the four preceding calendar years.

Special rules apply for the purchase of homes that are more accessible or better suited to the personal needs and care of an individual who is eligible for the Disability Tax Credit. In these cases, the HBTC can be claimed even if the first time homebuyer criteria is not met.

How Much is the Tax Credit?

The $5,000 non-refundable tax credit provides up to $750 of federal tax relief. It is based on a down payment of $5,000 and is calculated by multiplying the lowest personal income tax rate (15%) x $5,000 = $750.

The individual’s spouse or common law partner may claim any unused portion of an individuals HBTC. When two or more eligible individuals jointly purchase the home, the credit may be shared but cannot exceed $750.

If only one individual is eligible to claim the tax credit, the percentage of that individuals ownership of the home can be used. ie. 50% of $750= $375

Also note, it is up to the applicant to ensure that they can provide documentation for the purchase transaction and that they meet the applicable eligibility requirements, should the CRA require proof.

For more information, you can visit the Department of Finance Canada website.

Here at Dominion Lending Centres, we are always happy to provide advice and help you with the financing of your first home!

Written by: 

JORDAN THOMSON

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Jordan is part of DLC City Wide Mortgage based in Vancouver, BC.

24 Mar

OBSTACLES FOR FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

OBSTACLES FOR FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS

First Time Home Buyers

With mortgage interest rates at historical lows, it is a wonderful time for first time home buyers to take the leap into the market. But there are some considerations and preparations to be made before starting the process.

A higher level of bank scrutiny has come into play now that the governance of CMHC has been shifted to the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI). The banks have been jumping through hoops to meet stricter lending policies and so must potential mortgage borrowers.

Mortgage rule changes that came into effect in July 2012 shortened the maximum allowable amortization on mortgages from 30-years down to 25-years. This has made it more difficult for buyers to meet debt-servicing requirements of lenders due to the higher monthly payments of the shorter repayment structure.

These two components of the lending landscape have put First Time Buyers in the hot seat. Most young people are newer to both the employment game and the credit world and have had limited time to build up their own savings for the down payment.

Canadian mortgage insurers (CMHC and Genworth) have minimum credit requirements of two years’ history on at least two credit accounts with a good repayment record. While potential borrowers may think it responsible not to overextend themselves with credit, they can be negatively affected by “under extending”. Paying on time on at least two accounts, such as a credit card or loan, demonstrates credit responsibility because these types of accounts report to the credit bureaus, a third party, and demonstrate a borrower’s credit responsibility.

Avoiding credit means there is no third party record of how credit is handled, leaving financial institutions lacking the tools to assess how a potential borrower will handle repayment of such a large loan. While it’s not advisable for young people to apply for credit everywhere, it is a good idea to establish two different credit accounts as soon as possible to create a strong credit history.

Because many first time home buyers are young people with limited employment history, there is a very good chance they have not saved up the minimum 5% down payment yet. Direct relatives, such as parents, can “gift” the down payment to their adult child to help them buy the home. There must be no requirement for re-payment and they should have no vested interest in the property being bought.

Keep in mind though that if the first time home buyer has limited credit and their down payment is being gifted, they are really not bringing much to the equation as far as their own personal risk, so many lenders are requiring co-applicants to bring some strength to the deal. If there is the potential for a purchase in the near future, it may be a good idea for the parents to put the gifted funds into their child’s personal bank account. As long as the money is in their name for at least 90-days, those funds are now considered their own and no longer gifted.

We here at Dominion Lending Centres are always available to help you – contact us today!

Written by: 

KRISTIN WOOLARD

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Kristin is part of DLC National based in Port Coquitlam, BC

24 Mar

Growing the Middle Class, Budget 2016. Mortgage Market Update March 24, 2016

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

21 Mar

NEW CREDIT REPORTING AND WHAT IT SAYS ABOUT YOU

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

9 FEB 2016

NEW CREDIT REPORTING AND WHAT IT SAYS ABOUT YOU

Credit ScoreNew credit reporting and what it says about you and your spending habits may make all the difference between you buying a home now or later.

When home buyers contact me to apply for a mortgage, I always review their credit report with them along with the rest of their application, before they start looking at homes with a Realtor. If there are any issues with the credit history we can determine the reason, the next course of action and how it will impact financing a purchase.

There is a lot of valuable information in a credit report which provides an overview for lenders about your ability to borrow money. Consistent late payments, collections and bankruptcy have the biggest impact on lowering your score. Running a high balance or over your limit on your credit cards will also drive your credit score down. Scores range from 300-900 and a difference in score by as little as 50 points says a lot to a lender about you as the borrower. For example, a score of 550-599 represents 21% of delinquencies while a score of 600-649 only 11%. Delinquency rates are defined as those who have late payments beyond 90 days. If your score falls from one bracket to the lower bracket with late payments or collections, the difference can affect the interest rate you can receive or, worse yet, if you can qualify for the mortgage amount you need.

The most recent software update for the credit bureau reporting system has added some features which could have a significant impact on reporting. The new reports, which were released in early 2015, show three credit scores and one overall score.

The first score ranks based on open credit and balance to limit ratio. So if you have lots of open credit and your balances are low or reasonable the score is higher. High balances or over limit on all credit cards will drop your score.

The second score ranks based on late payments and collections over $250. If your late payments are beyond 90 days, your score will drop dramatically.

The third score ranks based on the number of third party collections in the last 3 years and the oldest revolving credit. So if you have outstanding parking tickets or an unpaid gym membership that you forgot about — they will come back to haunt you.

These individual scores were created to show specific behaviour by a borrower and if the credit score is trending up or down. This can give the lender an indication of a chronic issues with a potential borrower or if they are consistent with their credit usage.

With mortgage payments, lines of credit, auto loans, credit cards and even cell phone bills now reporting on the credit report,  consumers have to be diligent with spending and paying bills on time.

I recommend to all my clients to keep your credit report clean — after all, it is your identity.

Establish at least two trade lines of a minimum of $2,000. One credit card and one personal line of credit for example.

Maintain lower balances (< 65%) on all lines of credit or credit cards.

Make payments a few days before they are due to ensure you are always on time

If you get a parking ticket, fight it and lose – pay the bill and don’t let it go to collection.

Look at your credit report annually and certainly 3-6 months before making any major purchase such as a car or home. To view your own credit report visit www.equifax.ca.

Written by: PAULINE TONKIN

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Pauline is part of DLC Innovative Mortgage Solutions based in Coquitlam, BC.

17 Mar

TOP 5 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR MORTGAGE LENDER BEFORE SIGNING ON THE DOTTED LINE

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

TOP 5 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR MORTGAGE LENDER  BEFORE SIGNING ON THE DOTTED LINE

Top 5 Questions To Ask Your Mortgage Lender Before Signing On the Dotted Line

1. How the penalties are calculated if I break my mortgage early? Specifically, ask what rate they use to calculate the “interest rate differential”. Typically, if the lender has “posted rates” they use these to calculate the penalty. If this is the case, the penalty can be 3, 4 or even 5 times higher than a mortgage lender that does not have posted rates and uses them in their early payout penalty calculation. This one question can save you thousands of dollars!

2. Is this a “collateral” mortgage? Some lenders have recently started putting all of their mortgages into what is called a “collateral” charge. In the right situation, given significant equity in the home, this product can be very useful and advantageous. The disadvantage to this product however, is that you cannot “switch” it to another lender at maturity. You have to actually discharge this type of mortgage and re-register a new one with a new lender which will cost on average $1000 for legal fees and appraisal costs. Beware of lenders who do this, especially if your mortgage is high ratio because it is only useful if you have more than 20% equity.

3. Can I “blend and extend” my mortgage if I buy another house? Most variable rate mortgages cannot be “blended” however, typically the penalty to break a variable is 3 months interest. Some lenders have changed their policies (very quietly) – instead of allowing you to add new money to a mortgage in the event of a new purchase, they require you to pay the full penalty. Some clients have been caught off guard by sneaky lenders who don’t tell them this until only a few days before close, at which time it’s too late to switch lenders.

4. What happens to my life insurance if I switch lenders at the end of my term? This is a very commonly overlooked detail by those who take the insurance offered by their bank or lender. The challenge is that if you want to “switch” your mortgage to another lender at the end of your term, you have to re-apply for insurance. The downside to this is that you’ll be five years older, and if you have developed any health issues, you may not qualify for the insurance at all. Getting insurance that mortgage brokers offer stays in place for the whole time you have your mortgage, no matter who your mortgage lender is.

5. What happens at the end of the term (typically five years)? Will they offer you the best rate they offer their new clients, or will you have to negotiate for best rates at that time. Most banks know that clients likely won’t make the effort to negotiate the best rates. Working with an independent specialist will provide you with the most competitive rates, not only when you buy your home, but when it comes up for renewal. A qualified professional will make sure you have the best options available each time your mortgage comes due.

Written by

BRIAN MILL

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Brian is part of Neighbourhood DLC based in Port Elgin, Ontario

16 Mar

ACCELERATED BI-WEEKLY VS. BI-WEEKLY PAYMENTS

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

ACCELERATED BI-WEEKLY VS. BI-WEEKLY PAYMENTS

Accelerated Bi-Weekly vs. Bi-Weekly Payments

When signing your mortgage commitment letter you will have to choose your payment frequency. If your goal is to re-pay your mortgage as quickly as possible, then you need to understand how different payment options will affect your repayment schedule.

So what are your options?

In general, most lenders will offer the borrower the option to decide which repayment schedule fits best with their lifestyle. The options include monthly, semi-monthly, bi-weekly, accelerated bi-weekly, weekly and accelerated weekly payments. Let’s use some simple math to determine which payment frequency will assist you in paying back your mortgage in the shortest time possible.

For the purposes of this exercise and to keep things simple, let’s use $100,000 as our mortgage amount. We’ll use a 5 year fixed rate at 2.54% with a 25 year amortization period and interest being compounded semi-annually.

Increasing your payment frequency doesn’t mean shortening your amortization.

As you can see from the table above, choosing to pay your mortgage more frequently doesn’t result in reducing your amortization schedule. The key to reducing your amortization is to make sure you choose an accelerated re-payment schedule.

We are going to focus on Accelerated bi-weekly vs. bi-weekly payments but the same principle can be applied to accelerated weekly payments as well.

By accelerating your repayment schedule, you reduce your amortization by 2.5 years.

Okay, we’ve just determined that accelerating your mortgage payments will reduce your amortization and the interest you pay. How does accelerated bi-weekly vs bi-weekly result in more principle being repaid?

It’s important to think of your payments as a stream of income for the mortgage lender. Mortgage payments are comprised of principal and interest payments. The interest is calculated based on your outstanding principal balance, meaning once the interest has been paid, the remainder of your payment is used towards paying down your principal balance.

By choosing an accelerated repayment schedule, the monthly payment is divided by 2 (bi-weekly) or by 4 (weekly). There are 52 weeks in a calendar year so if you make 26 bi-weekly payments, you are in effect paying your Lender the equivalent of 13 months of payments per year compared to 12 months payments with all non-accelerated repayment schedules.

This accelerated repayment of principal is what shortens your amortization.

13 monthly payments ÷ 26 = accelerated bi-weekly payment

Example: ($449.96 per month x 13 months) ÷ 26 = $224.98 accelerated bi-weekly payment

With a non-accelerated or regular payment plan, the Lender takes 12 months worth of payments and divides this by either 26 or 52 to come up with the bi-weekly (or weekly) payment. With this adjusted payment, the Lender still receives a stream of income of 12 monthly payments per year, so there is no additional principal available to accelerate the amortization.

12 monthly payments ÷ 26 = regular bi-weekly payment

Example: ($449.96 per month x 12 months) ÷ 26 = $207.67 regular bi-weekly payment

So now you know why choosing accelerated bi-weekly vs. bi-weekly payments results in 1 extra month of payments per year, which in turn shortens your amortization.

I always recommend this to anyone who can afford the increase in payment but I understand this option isn’t right for everyone. Another option to help shorten your amortization is to increase your payments, meaning more principal paid.

When you’re choosing your next mortgage, make sure you discuss payment options with your Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional that align with your overall goals for repaying your mortgage.

 

Written by 

BRENT SHEPHEARD

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Brent is part of DLC Canadian Mortgage Evolution West based in North Vancouver, BC.

11 Mar

Bank of Canada keep overnight target the same. Mortgage Market Update March 11, 2016

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

 

 
 


 


Anne Martin
Mortgage Agent | FSCO # M10002257

705-720-1001
1-800-500-1841 
 
anne@ndlc.ca | www.barriemortgagelocators.com

39 Collier Street, Ste 300 Barrie ON L4M 1G5

  

  Neighbourhood Dominion Lending Centres |  FSCO 11764  Independently Owned & Operated
 

 
Friday, March 11, 2016
Bank of Canada Update

To no one’s surprise, the Bank of Canada announced that it would leave its overnight rate target at 1/2%, just as it did on January 20 when it last met. The Bank noted that financial market volatility has slowed since the last meeting and oil prices and the Canadian dollar have strengthened. Consumer spending continues to underpin the economy as employment growth has held up despite continued weakness in the energy sector.

Read more..

Here is a link to a bond site for those who want to follow bond yield more closely, this is the site we rely on for our information.

http://www.investing.com/rates-bonds/canada-5-year-bond-yield-streaming-chart


P.S. If you, your family, or co-workers require guidance on current market trends, please call me, I am always available to help.

…Anne

 

CONGRATULATIONS !
to the 2015 Grand Prize Winners of our $25,000 Cash Giveaway Contest

Click below to find out who won – Was it You?

Grand Prize Winner #1

Grand Prize Winner #2


 
To enter, close a mortgage through Neighbourhood Dominion Lending Centres (including switches and refinancing) OR refer others to do the same. For each deal that closes, you and your referral will receive an entry ballot! The more referrals you send, the better your chances of winning!

Call me for more details.


 Historical Interest Rate Graphs   

Below you will find a feature which will give you current interest rate trends. It  can also be accessed on our web site. I hope you and your clients find it useful

Click here to  access rate graphs 


My Commitment to You 

  • Constant update of Market Conditions
  • Innovative Mortgage Products
  • Value Added Services
  • Unbiased Advice
  • Innovative Mortgage Strategies and NOT just Order Taking

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10 Mar

When a Reverse Mortgage Doesn’t Make Sense.

General

Posted by: Anne Martin

reverse mortgages (CHIP) program doesn’t always make good financial or personal sense.  Mortgage agents are brokers are trained to examine the situation and advise on what the alternative are and if the CHIP program is right for you.  

Check out this blog to hear an example.

When a Reverse Mortgage Doesn’t Make Sense – Dominion Lending Centres http://ow.ly/ZjScN